TOP
Tuesday,October 22,2019 11:14 AM
  • Home
  • Archive
  • Nagged by a sticky job interview? Don’t quit

Nagged by a sticky job interview? Don’t quit

By Vision Reporter

Added 27th June 2010 03:00 AM

IMAGINE having prepared for a job interview for days only to land on harsh or even rude interviewers. Do not mind this. Some interviewers try to intimidate their interviewees as a strategy to check their confidence, patience, capability or sincerity.

By Vique-Ocean Kahinju

IMAGINE having prepared for a job interview for days only to land on harsh or even rude interviewers. Do not mind this. Some interviewers try to intimidate their interviewees as a strategy to check their confidence, patience, capability or sincerity.

According to Cedric Sisilo, a former Human Resource consultant and Manager at World Food Programme (WFP) Tanzania, some interviewers often ask odd questions to see how quickly you can think and whether you can do it right and calmly, without losing your cool.

Other interviewers, unfortunately, throw unsettling questions to interviewees because they enjoy seeing them squirm. While others, are amused by the range of creative and not-so-creative responses they receive.
Sisilo adds that it is imperative to note that not every professional who conducts job interviews with candidates knows how to conduct an interview effectively.

In fact, some are downright lousy at it.
A bad interviewer might be unprepared and unfocused, show no interest at what you are saying, while another might dominate the interview by doing all the talking or asking inappropriate and illegal questions.

Do not be surprised if such an interviewer not read your resume and does not even know what to ask.

“There are moments when you can encounter a rhetoric, big-mouthed panelist. Never show your irritation, instead be an attentive listener and hang on their every word. Also try to get a word in by leaning forward and opening your mouth slightly,” advises Anne Kadet on Smartmoney.com.

“Job interviewing can be an unnerving experience. But if you know how to handle some of the stickiest situations encountered in the process, you can confident that you have nailed the job - right in front of the panel members,” explains Jolly Atuhaire, the Human Resource Manager at National Environment Authority.

Some times interviewers ask inappropriate and illegal questions, but try your hardest to keep the interview focused on your qualifications for the job.

Here are some tricky questions that should not make you sweat at an interview.

Questions about being terminated from a previous job; Most job-seekers confess to being uncomfortable when asked the reasons about why they were terminated or why they resigned.

“Do not lie about it and do not dwell on it either. You could explain that you and the company were not a good fit, hence your performance suffered. Or that you and your supervisor had differing view points. Emphasise what you learned from the experience that will prevent you from repeating it and ensure that you will perform well in the future,” advises Sisilo.

Questions about the future; interviewees are often asked, “Where do you see yourself in five or 10 years?
“Strike a delicate balance when responding to this kind of question, with just the right mix of honesty, ambition and your desire to be working at this company long-term.

Avoid responses such as starting your own business, or running for Parliamentary seat, which will suggest that you do not plan to stay with the company,” Sisilo cautions.

Professionally, it is illegal to ask the interviewee about their age, marital status, children or childcare arrangements, but employers still ask. In such cases, Sisilo advises, it is best to address the concern behind the question rather than the question itself.

“No matter what interviewees face during the screening, they need to think of each question as an opportunity to showcase an accomplishment or strength,” Sisilo advises.

He adds that every response should build momentum towards convincing the interviewer that you deserve to advance to the next level, whether that level is another round of interviews or a job offer.

Nagged by a sticky job interview? Don’t quit

Related Articles

More From The Author

Related articles