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Tuesday,September 17,2019 19:16 PM

Textile prints stand out in art show

By Vision Reporter

Added 23rd January 2003 03:00 AM

Textile prints are quite uncommon at art exhibitions, but Josephine Mukasa and Esther Ndagire’s printed textiles and decorative fabrics— on show at the seventh ‘Different But One’ exhibition taking place at the Margaret Trowell School of Industrial and Fine Art— are outstanding.

By Edris Kisambira

Textile prints are quite uncommon at art exhibitions, but Josephine Mukasa and Esther Ndagire’s printed textiles and decorative fabrics— on show at the seventh ‘Different But One’ exhibition taking place at the Margaret Trowell School of Industrial and Fine Art— are outstanding.

While it was the idea of Mukasa, the dean of the school, to celebrate the Women’s Congress of 2002 held at Makerere University, Ndagire (also lecturer at the school) wanted to look at artistic impressions of Ganda musical instruments and pre-colonial currencies.

Mukasa says: “Impressed by the quality of colour, line and shape interactions of the visitors during any pause in the proceedings, I decided to express this in the way that I felt after the Congress and I went for it. The exchange of ideas closed the boundaries between developed, developing and disadvantaged approaches to development as expressed in my various combination of motif as artistic statements.”

One of Ndagire’s prints is a mixture of golden brown, brown and grey. The motifs depict impressions of instruments like Ganda drums, horns and others used then and now.

Another of her prints depicts the many local currencies that were used before the arrival of paper money, both bringing out beautiful prints that would envy the printers at the AGOA facility in Bugolobi.
Ndagire says textile prints will pick up. She adds that since the introduction of the AGOA initiative, students are beginning to get interested in the textile designs, though it has not been taken seriously by students in the past.

There are also water and oil paints ranging from Godfrey Banadda’s cubism to Jacob Odama’s child portrait. The themes are diverse and this is done in justification of the title of the show that was dubbed different but one.

Rivka Uziel Krispin, a visiting curator from Israel and chief organiser of the show says there are 22 participating lecturers herself among them.
Uziel’s chosen theme is birds. She says dealing with birds in art is like dealing with hope and peace a symbol that is well known in the Bible.

The huge eagles she draws in a technique she calls her own appeal for universal peace.

Textile prints stand out in art show

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