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‘Calling bosses names shows dishonesty’

By Vision Reporter

Added 29th November 2009 03:00 AM

WHEN you start characterising your boss at the workplace, then it means you are not being honest. But this happens everywhere.

By Vision reporter

WHEN you start characterising your boss at the workplace, then it means you are not being honest. But this happens everywhere.

While sometimes it is out of frustration, there are times when it is down to excitement; “the pleasure you derive in dealing with your superior at the workplace.” We all love them simple and cool, cajoling, understanding and all.

Unfortunately, in organisations with clear goals, there is no boss, who will pat you on the back every time you begin to rant about a problem or two.

Yet work has to go on normally. So, are you going to spend all your time sulking at your desk, or will you be shrewd enough to win your boss over?

Problem is that most people try too hard to be in your superior’s good books and in the process, they end up currying favours, or bootlicking. That is not professional. There are better ways to win over the confidence of your boss as long as he appreciates hardwork. There is nothing that comes as good as productive hardwork.

The boss not only wants to see you working hard, he also wants results. If you are really working hard and yet the boss is still a thorn-in-your life, don’t lose your cool. Find out why your boss is behaving the way he does.

The problem is that most people rarely stop to think about the fact that bosses too, have bosses. Pressure from the top rungs of the ladder is passed on to the lower echelon and for many.

If only all personnel would think along that box, then workplaces would have few people resorting to character-assassination of their supervisors.

‘Calling bosses names shows dishonesty’

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