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War against use of DDT to curb malaria still on

By Vision Reporter

Added 12th July 2004 03:00 AM

Malaria is a serious problem that remains the number one killer in the country.

Malaria is a serious problem that remains the number one killer in the country.

The Ministry of Health admits that malaria deaths are getting out of hand but are quick to add that hope is not lost yet.

They are keeping hope alive in the belief that one day there will be a green light to launch a vicious battle against mosquitoes by the use of DDT.

The ministry has been lobbying for support to use DDT to get rid of the deadly vectors. However, this has received mixed reactions from the National Environmental Management Authority- (NEMA) and some legislators headed by Lubaga South MP, Ken Lukyamuzi.

NEMA insists that the Ministry of Health must first carry out the Environmental Impact Assessment which should then be subjected to public hearing.

Lukyamuzi, on the other hand has threatened to mobilise a huge demonstration against the government should the ministry sanction the use of DDT.

In yet another twist of events, Butebo MP, Dr. Steven Malinga alleged that DDT causes impotence, adding that it affects cells that are crucial in the formation of ovaries in females.
Malinga is now advocating the use of other drugs such as pyrethrum which he says is widely grown in Kenya to fight malaria.
But the manager of the Malaria Control Programme in the ministry, Dr. John Bosco Rwakimale says the only way forward in the fight against malaria is the use of DDT.
He adds that the same chemical has been used in America, South Africa and Egypt without any side effects on the environment or any health implications on the citizens of those countries.
Rwakimale also blames clinic owners who think that when DDT is used to control the spread of malaria, the sale of chloroquine, fansidar and mosquito nets may go down, and affect their business.

War against use of DDT to curb malaria still on

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