Opinion
Why should Uganda opt for vocational educational
Publish Date: Jun 24, 2014
newvision
  • mail
  • img

By Sarah M. Natumanya

Vocational education is a form of education based on occupation or employment, also known as career and technical education.

It can also be defined as a system or course of study that prepares individuals with jobs that are based on manual or practical activities. Vocational education can be secondary or post secondary and can be taken at any age.
 

Sometimes we do not have the abilities to make it to universities due to unavoidable circumstances say inefficient incomes, the grades we obtain or even the admission process we undergo.

We should not be worried, there are institutions that are ready to give us hands on skills and these are vocational institutes.
 

There is need to urgently opt for vocational education in Uganda because there is an incompatibility between the output of higher education and the labour market.

The education system of Uganda needs to significantly improve the quality of education and type of specialisation and generally needs to develop a new educational curriculum and training methods to align with the needs of the labour market.

Ugandan private sector requires technical and professional subjects and this would make the Uganda’s economy shift from excessive dependence on expatriate labour to rely on national employment.

For Uganda to develop, both the private sector and the public sector have to be active.
 

Secondly, the labour market of Uganda is becoming more specialised; there demand for high levels of skills in both government and private businesses has increased.

Vocational education and training is what can answer all the economic questions Uganda, if facing especially when it comes to Unemployment.

The theoretical education we obtain leaves us with no option other than seeking for jobs time and again. Added on with the levels of experience required to take on certain job opportunities, many graduates are left out of the equations.
 

Vocational Education offers a wide variety of options in administrative, business, computer technology, printing, agriculture, automobile, craftsmanship, laboratory, and cosmetic fields.

Specifically, these courses include typewriting, secretarial practices, computer operator, desktop publishing, laboratory technician, librarian, mechanic, electrical technician, plumbing, refrigeration and air conditioning, tailoring, beautician, etc.
 

Due to higher numbers of graduates, the public sector alone cannot provide jobs for all. This, therefore, calls for massive investment in vocational institutions where graduates will have skills that they can employ without waiting for jobs from the Government. In every institution there is need for technical personnels.
 

As an advocate for children missing out on education and learning I appeal to the public to join me in the struggle for establishment of more vocational institutes and the Government to sensitise the public about the significances of adopting vocational education aimed at helping children from different backgrounds acquire technical skills that will prepare them for Various job offers.
 

It is high time we stopped thinking that vocational education is for failures instead we should embrace it wholeheartedly, if the country is to realise development of both public and private sectors.
 

The writer is a global youth ambassador with A World at School

The statements, comments, or opinions expressed through the use of New Vision Online are those of their respective authors, who are solely responsible for them, and do not necessarily represent the views held by the staff and management of New Vision Online.

New Vision Online reserves the right to moderate, publish or delete a post without warning or consultation with the author.Find out why we moderate comments. For any questions please contact digital@newvision.co.ug

  • mail
  • img
blog comments powered by Disqus
Also In This Section
Let’s emulate Tanzania’s unity and stability
By Charles Okecha The aftermath of decades of turbulence was sufficient to goad Ugandans to live and govern themselves prudently knowing very well what is at stake. Yet to this very day, it takes heavy Police deployment to secure local and national elections....
Road transport crashes, the biggest Ugandan insecurity
A bout two weeks ago, a friend of man was involved in an accident involving a boda boda he was riding on and a speeding vehicle at Nakawa....
Amend the constitution cautiously
A constitution is defined as a body of fundamental principles or established precedents according to which a state is acknowledged to be governed....
Predicting the future: Is Uganda ready for a data driven economy
As science fiction writer Arthur Clarke said, "If by some miracle, a prophet could describe the future exactly as it was going to take place, his predictions would sound so far-fetched, so absurd, that everyone would laugh him to scorn....
What drives moral progress?
What would happen if the ancient Greek philosopher Plato partook in contemporary dialogues about the types of questions that he first posed, and that continue to vex us? In my view, he would have many new questions – including about our increasingly psychological approach to philosophical discussio...
The digital road from poverty
Where should the global community focus its attention over the next 15 years? Health, nutrition, and education may seem like obvious choices; more surprisingly, there is a strong case for making broadband access a top priority....
Is gambling the cause of poverty amomg youth?
Yes
No
Can't Say
follow us
subscribe to our news letter