World
Khartoum welcomes South Sudan peace deal
Publish Date: May 11, 2014
Khartoum welcomes South Sudan peace deal
south Sudan president Salva Kiir (L) and SPLM Opposition leader Riek Machar (R) hand over the Cessation of Hostilities treaty over the war in South Sudan on Friday in Addis Ababa. PHOTO/AFP
  • mail
  • img
newvision

KHARTOUM - Khartoum on Saturday welcomed a peace deal reached to end five months of war between the government and rebels in neighbouring South Sudan.

The foreign ministry affirmed Sudan's "welcome and support" for the agreement between the South's President Salva Kiir and rebel leader Riek Machar, the official SUNA news agency said.

The deal is important not only for Sudan but for the region, said ministry spokesman Abubakr al-Siddiq.

"Sudan is ready to offer any support that can help in the implementation of this agreement," he said, quoted by SUNA.

Through the East African regional block IGAD, Sudan has been part of efforts to find a peaceful settlement in the South.

A ceasefire was due to come into effect on Saturday after Kiir and Machar shook hands in the Ethiopian capital to reach a deal on Friday.

The South separated from Khartoum's jurisdiction three years ago under a 2005 peace deal that ended 23 years of civil war.

But the newly-independent South plunged into its own war on December 15, in what started as a personal rivalry between Kiir and his sacked vice-president Machar.

Thousands and possibly tens of thousands of people have been killed and more than 1.2 million more forced to flee their homes.

The United Nations says in excess of 67,000 South Sudanese have crossed into Sudan because of the fighting.

"People arriving in Sudan tend to come with few if any possessions, having either sold them or had them stolen during flight. Children are arriving with malnutrition rates over the emergency threshold," the UN's Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs said in its latest weekly bulletin issued Thursday.

Oil flowing from southern fields through Sudan for export is worth billions of dollars to both economies, but production has been cut since war began in South Sudan.

AFP


RELATED

S. Sudan frontlines 'calm' as ceasefire comes into force

Warring South Sudan rivals sign peace deal

In full: deal to resolve S. Sudan crisis

What Kiir, Machar peace deal means for Uganda

The statements, comments, or opinions expressed through the use of New Vision Online are those of their respective authors, who are solely responsible for them, and do not necessarily represent the views held by the staff and management of New Vision Online.

New Vision Online reserves the right to moderate, publish or delete a post without warning or consultation with the author.Find out why we moderate comments. For any questions please contact digital@newvision.co.ug

  • mail
  • img
blog comments powered by Disqus
Also In This Section
Number of hungry in world falls below 800 million: UN
The number of hungry people around the world has dropped below 800 million for the first time since the UN started counting, the Food and Agriculture Organisation said in an annual report on Wednesday....
Probe after Air France plane narrowly misses mountain
French accident investigators have opened an inquiry into a near accident involving an Air France Boeing 777 which narrowly missed central Africa's highest mountain with 37 people on board....
S. Korea, US, Japan envoys discuss N. Korea nuclear concerns
Nuclear envoys from the three nations met, seeking a way forward to revive long-stalled, six-party talks with North Korea on its nuclear weapons programme....
Kenya hunts Al-Shabaab after Garissa ambush
KENYAN police revealed they were engaged in a major security operation against Al-Shabaab militants...
Burundians asked to donate money for elections
THE government of Burundi has appealed for public donations so that it could go ahead with controversial elections that have sparked weeks of civil unrest and a coup attempt...
Poorest countries neglected by foreign aid donors: report
The world's poorest nations, the bulk of which are in sub-Saharan Africa, are receiving less than a third of development aid, and this support is waning, a non-governmental organisation founded by U2 frontman Bono said Tuesday....
Should medical students be subjected to pre-admission exams?
Yes
No
Can't Say
follow us
subscribe to our news letter