UWA digs trenches around Murchison Park
Publish Date: Mar 27, 2014
UWA digs trenches around Murchison Park
Trenches are being dug by Uganda Wildlife Authority around Murchison Falls National Park to prevent elephants from straying into Lamwo district. PHOTO/Francis Emorut
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By Francis Emorut

MURCHISON FALLS - Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA) has embarked on digging trenches around Murchison Falls National Park to prevent elephants from straying into the villages.

The move follows the death of three men killed by elephants recently in Oyam district.

“We are digging trenches around the Murchison Falls National Park to stop the elephants from straying to the districts of Lamwo and Oyam,” said Raymond Engena, UWA’s director of tourism and business partnership.

He explained that the trenches will be dug covering a distance of 57km.

The elephants from the national park recently strayed into Oyam district and killed three men and injured a boy.

Their death has since caused panic among the residents who are now more wary of the potential danger posed by the wild animals.

Elephants, pictured here grazing at Murchison, can mean to turn into aggressive attackers. PHOTO/Francis Emorut

Raymond Engena, the director for tourism and business partnership of UWA. PHOTO/Francis Emorut

Oyam South Woman MP Betty Amongi and the district leaders implored UWA administration to also consider planting pepper and putting bee hives around the boundaries of park.

According to analysts, red pepper and the presence of bees scares off elephants.

The government is considering building an electric fence around the park as a long-term solution to bar animals from straying into the gardens of residents living near the park.

This will be made possible when the funds are available and when there is constant electricity supply, according to the tourism minister Maria Mutagamba.

Residents living near the parks like Queen Elizabeth, Kidepo and Murchison and others have complained about animals destroying their crops and demand that government provides a long-lasting solution to the problem.

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