• No_Ads
Business
Arabica coffee prices increasePublish Date: Feb 14, 2014
Arabica coffee prices increase
  • mail
  • img
A farmer picks Arabica coffee beans. A kilogramme of Arabica now goes for sh4,200 from sh3,000
newvision

By Daniel Edyegu

Prices of Arabica coffee parchment have rebounded to sh4,200 per kilogramme, up from sh3,000 after nearly six months of price stagnation.

The increment came at the right time, the back-to-school period, when most coffee farmers need to pay school fees for their children. Students and pupils reported back to school for the first term on February 3.

Joseph Sodo, a coffee farmer from Katongo parish, Kapchorwa district, explained that the rise had offered a lease of hope to the coffee business.

Sodo, who has a child in secondary school and two at primary level, last week sold off 32 bags to get fees for them.

“With the price increment, it means each 65-kg bag of premium Arabica coffee parchment rose to sh273,000 up from sh195,000. I got sh8.7m which enabled me to pay my children’s fees,” Sodo said.

“The huge gain I made from this increment, however, is the fact that I had 2,400kg of stocked parchment that I had purchased when prices were still low.”

Prices of Arabica coffee parchment in Bugisu region are mainly dependent on the price at the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) where its green beans trade under the name Bugisu Arabica.

For over six months, Bugisu Arabica had been trading at $2.4 per kilogramme of green beans. The price, however, rose to $2.7 per kilogramme towards the close of January, prompting a rise in local prices.

Since prices of premium parchment peaked at sh11,000 per kilogramme in 2011, prices had kept a steady drop settling at sh3,000.

Godfrey Woniala, a coffee farmer from Sisiyi subcounty, Bulambuli district, explained that the increase would motivate farmers to put in more effort in tending their plantations during the coming season.

“We had lost hope. Coffee is so costly to maintain because it requires fertilisers, pruning, weeding and spraying before even the actual processing of red cherries into parchment. When prices are low, it doesn’t make business sense to invest more and reap less”.

The statements, comments, or opinions expressed through the use of New Vision Online are those of their respective authors, who are solely responsible for them, and do not necessarily represent the views held by the staff and management of New Vision Online.

New Vision Online reserves the right to moderate, publish or delete a post without warning or consultation with the author.Find out why we moderate comments. For any questions please contact digital@newvision.co.ug

  • mail
  • img
blog comments powered by Disqus
Also In This Section
Embrace domestic tourism - minister
When Kampalans were told to exploit domestic tourism by minister of tourism Maria Mutagamba at Speke Resort Munyonyo, men craned their necks to take second glances at curvy ladies dressed in flowing saris and tight fitting Jeans trousers....
Uganda
The volume of flights, passengers and cargo, according to data from Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), Entebbe International Airport are on a steady increase....
Uganda’s Cotton exports to increase, thanks to WTO
Cotton exports from Uganda are set to increase once the recommendations by trade ministers in the Bali 9th ministerial conference are implemented....
New laboratory to increase milk exports
Uganda is set earn more from milk exports following the opening of a testing laboratory that meets the International Standards (ISO) 17025 and International Dairy Federation requirements....
AU calls for investment in agric
Lack of modern technology for agricultural practice is to blame for the low production of food on the African continent....
Museveni roots for more investors
President Yoweri Museveni has emphasised the importance of devising means through which more investors can be attracted to come and do business in Uganda....
Is the return of Buganda Properties a sign of good Governance?
Yes
No
Can't Say
follow us
subscribe to our news letter