Health
HIV fight: Rwanda in 'non-surgical' circumcision drive
Publish Date: Nov 27, 2013
newvision
  • mail
  • img

KIGALI - Rwanda launched Tuesday a national drive to "non-surgically" circumcise 700,000 men in a bid to cut rates of HIV infection, claiming to be the first country in the world to do so.

The government said circumcision was one of its key strategies for "achieving an AIDS-free generation" in Rwanda, where around 210,000 people are living with HIV.

Non-surgical circumcision involves a plastic device called PrePex comprising two rings and an elastic band that cuts off blood supply to the foreskin, which shrivels and is removed with the band after a week.

Minister of Health Agnes Binagwaho said it had been "clinically validated as a bloodless procedure that doesn't necessitate injected anaesthesia".

"Rwanda is the first country to launch non-surgical adult male circumcision with an aim of reducing HIV infection," Binagwaho said at the launch of the project, which is backed by the World Health Organisation.

The health ministry said it "aims to circumcise 700,000 adult men between ages 15-49" by the end of 2016.

"Studies have shown that circumcision reduces the risk of heterosexually acquired HIV/AIDS infection by roughly 60 percent," the ministry said in a statement, adding that "male circumcision is one of the key strategies to achieving an AIDS-free generation."

The makers of PrePex boast that a man "can resume work and almost all daily activities shortly after the procedure", with the device "designed to be placed, worn, and removed with minimal disruption", although they should abstain from sex for six weeks afterwards.

The device takes only five minutes to apply. Tzameret Fuerst, president of PrePex, described it as "a very simple procedure that any nurse can conduct."

Rwanda's adult HIV rate of 2.9 percent is already quite low compared to some other African nations.

As well as Rwanda, the PrePex device is already also being used in Botswana, Kenya, Mozambique, South Africa, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

AFP

The statements, comments, or opinions expressed through the use of New Vision Online are those of their respective authors, who are solely responsible for them, and do not necessarily represent the views held by the staff and management of New Vision Online.

New Vision Online reserves the right to moderate, publish or delete a post without warning or consultation with the author.Find out why we moderate comments. For any questions please contact digital@newvision.co.ug

  • mail
  • img
blog comments powered by Disqus
Also In This Section
Heart problems more prevalent in younger people
Recent statistics show that heart problems are increasingly becoming more prevalent in children, teenagers and young adults....
Committee set up to clear HIV/AIDS messages
The team will scrutinize and clear all anti-HIV/AIDS campaign messages before they are disseminated to the public....
Ugandan team takes Ebola experience to Liberia
A team of Ugandan health workers are deployed by the WHO to provide medical support for an Ebola treatment centre in Liberia's capital....
New test fast-tracks diagnosis for malaria
A new invention can cheaply and accurately diagnose malaria infection in just a few minutes using only a droplet of blood....
Mwinyi impressed by cancer ward progress
Former president of Tanzania, Ali Hassan Mwinyi has commended the construction of Rotary and Centenary Bank cancer ward...
Drug resistant TB on increase in Lango region
The number of cases of Multi Drug Resistant(MDR) tuberculosis(TB) is worrying health workers...
Do you think banning the sale of single cigarette sticks will help regulate tobacco production?
yes
No
Can't Say
follow us
subscribe to our news letter