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Poor record keeping affecting fish farmers

By Vision Reporter

Added 20th March 2014 02:28 PM

Poor record keeping is one of the challenges most fish farmers in Uganda face. The problem hinders the sustainability of their fish farming businesses, Assistant commissioner aquaculture management, Andrew Alio, has said.

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By Vivian Agaba
 
Poor record keeping is one of the challenges most fish farmers in Uganda face. The problem hinders the sustainability of their fish farming businesses,  Assistant commissioner aquaculture management, Andrew Alio, has said.
 
“For every business to be successful, proper tracking of the records is very important. Otherwise if you do not keep records of your farm businesses, how will you know whether you are making profits or losses and how to improve to keep the business booming,” said Alio.
 
He said sometimes, finances meant to cater for the farms are also used for other personal gains and a farmer cannot raise more funds to inject into the business for its continuity.
 
Alio was addressing a group of fish farmers from Kenya in the company of their colleagues from Uganda. 
 
Fish farmers from Kenya are here on a five-day tour organised by the Walimi Fish Cooperative Society (WAFICOS) and will be visiting several successful fish farmers around the country to learn and share skills and experiences in Aquaculture industry.
 
Willy Cornelius Kwiri, head of technical team (WAFICOS) said record keeping helps in developing data base for proper planning and projections for the future of the business. 
 
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 Dr. John Walakira showing fish farmers from Kenya the proper handling of fish in ponds during a training and study tour of fish farmers at Kajjansi aquaculture research centre. Photo by Mary Kansiime
 
“If a fish farmer does not keep farm records, how will they know how much they invested in the business, how much to expect in return after harvesting, marketing and when to invest more money in the business,”Kwiri said.
 
Kwiri attributed the problem to lack of information, training and limited extension of services to fish farmers especially those dwelling in rural areas adding that training and outreach is the best way fish farmers can be helped overcome the problem.
 
James Wanyangi, chairman Agriculture livestock and fisheries committee Kiambu county assembly in Kenya applauded Uganda’s fish farmers for their capacity building in fish farming. He noted that Uganda is much far ahead in fish production and consumption than Kenya.
 

Poor record keeping affecting fish farmers

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