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Clean up security organs, organise functioning LCs to avert insecurity

By Admin

Added 23rd March 2017 10:56 AM

Even though the force together with other security agencies are commendably doing their best, the recent wave of murders in the country are real signs of lapse in the duties assigned to them.

Clean up security organs,  organise functioning LCs to avert insecurity

George Ntambaazi is a political analyst

Even though the force together with other security agencies are commendably doing their best, the recent wave of murders in the country are real signs of lapse in the duties assigned to them.

By George Ntambaazi

The Uganda Police Force is charged with the responsibility of protecting lives and property, preserving law and order, and ensuring safety and well-being of citizens through the detection and apprehension of criminals in cooperation with the population.

Even though the force together with other security agencies are commendably doing their best, the recent wave of murders in the country are real signs of lapse in the duties assigned to them.

 The breadth and clinical execution of the targets by assassins and criminal gangs despite enormous investments in our country's security architecture are signs of insecurity that deserve serious attention.

Alongside this debate, are the connected concerns of the role of the traumatized citizens and the threatened criminal justice system in the wake of this terror. The nature of assistance the average citizen has with the police, determines citizen's confidence in the country's security system. 

It is true that Uganda's security architecture is very ambitious both in scope and degree. This is because no single force or group can alone shoulder the enormous burden of averting insecurity.

We have a network of intelligence officers from regional, national, district, sub county, parish to village level. In addition, we have the indomitable UPDF, ISO, ESO, CMI, CID, JATT, SFC, Flying Squad, Special Investigators Bureau, Uganda Prisons Service, auxiliary and reserve forces, crime preventers and numerous private security organizations. However, we do not have functioning village (LC1) and parish (LC2) local councils, which are very critical in ensuring vigilance of the locals in in preventing and detecting crime.

The manner under which a high profile officer at the level of AIGP Andrew Felix Kaweesi, his body guard Kenneth Erau and driver Godfrey Mambewa were helplessly murdered, in broad day light frightened the nation. This coupled with the murder of sheiks and State prosecutor Joan Kagezi, raises more questions about our alertness and apprehension of the masterminds of such acts.

The country now faces an uphill task of dealing with untold anxiety and fear remiscent of its ugly past even if we have had relative peace for the past decades.

President Museveni, the Commander- in chief must take a pragmatic response, not only to the threat of shrewd assassins and criminal gangs but also to his principle officers in uniform managing our security organs.

Whether the recent murders were an outside or inside plot, the in-fighting and jostling for positions and money, or personal inefficiency endangering operational efficiency, is quite frankly, a distraction from dealing with the realities of security lapses and frailty.

We need concrete safeguards in the security sector but also well organized and facilitated local councils to stay clear of unforeseen dangers in our communities.  Any veiled attempt to overlook the harsh reality and attempts to save peoples reputations and careers will be a time bomb that will escalate and lead to debilitating outcomes.

President Museveni has now toughened and directed the restless IGP Gen. Kale Kaihura to clean up police that has been infiltrated by criminals. He has also demanded more financial support so that we can have a well-equipped police. However, we must be cautious that our operational support has always been on loan. We only train our forces, buy equipment like surveillance cameras, send forces to regional security commitments only when the African Union, United Nations or Washington signs on them.

Life is priceless but in the wake of our eminent national challenges in education, health, roads and rampant corruption, there is little evidence that Ugandans will be willing to support substantially more on classified police or military expenditure. We would rather spend that money by facilitating the Electoral Commission to organize credible local councils that we vigilantly believe in rather than postponing the elections.

The writer is a political analyst

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