Parrot comes out of Chameleone’s shadow

By Vision Reporter

He has been behind two great shadows, but each time comes out a better artiste. Master Parrot, who has worked with the top two rivalling crews (Jose Chameleone’s Leone Island and Bobi Wine’s Fire Base), launched his debut project, Njagala Sente, recently at Lido Beach in Entebbe.

By Vision Reporter

He has been behind two great shadows, but each time comes out a better artiste. Master Parrot, who has worked with the top two rivalling crews (Jose Chameleone’s Leone Island and Bobi Wine’s Fire Base), launched his debut project, Njagala Sente, recently at Lido Beach in Entebbe.

Certainly, Njagala Sente puts him in the ranks of local top-notch entertainers. It highlights a career that became explosive with the release of Kikompola in 2001 when he was still under the Fire Base Crew. With the success of Kikompola, it looked like Parrot was heading for greater musical heights.

However, when he quit Fire Base for Leone Island, Parrot soon started his journey into oblivion. But Parrot would soon realise his mistakes, and his decision to go for a solo career has since paid off.

Njagala Sente is such an impressive effort with six catchy tracks. On the album, Parrot, a dancehall artiste, uses a diverse list of producers to bring out such intriguing sounds.

Jose Chameleone’s talented hand features on the title track, Njagala Sente, on which he also provides back up vocals.

Parrot raps his former crewmates for not paying him yet he served them faithfully.

Njagala Sente has chronic hooks that could easily get lodged in one’s brain. Here, he delivers a powerful vocal performance that makes you want to listen to the song over and over again.

Other songs on the album include: Mbirigo, a revised rendition of Chameleone’s Kipepeo and Ayi Mukama Katonda is a gospel song, which borrows heavily from the reggae genre. Another song is Omukazi Omufirika, which talks about an African woman.

Parrot comes out of Chameleone’s shadow