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Anti-corruption experts discuss new strategies to fight corruption

By Cecilia Okoth

Added 19th November 2019 04:00 PM

orruption world over has become so sophisticated that anti-corruption agencies must become sophisticated especially in the use of mechanisms like the electronic gathering of digital evidence and forensic investigations.

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Irene Mulyagonja, the Inspector General of Government (right) interacting with Sarah Birungi, president asset recovery inter-agency network for East Africa (left), during the photo session at in Kampala (Photo by Jimmy Outa)

orruption world over has become so sophisticated that anti-corruption agencies must become sophisticated especially in the use of mechanisms like the electronic gathering of digital evidence and forensic investigations.

GRAFT

Experts under their umbrella organisation, the Eastern Africa Association of Anti-Corruption Authorities have convened in Kampala to discuss new forms and strategies of tackling corruption in the region.

Corruption world over has become so sophisticated that anti-corruption agencies must become sophisticated especially in the use of mechanisms like the electronic gathering of digital evidence and forensic investigations.

Speaking at the opening of the meeting in Kampala on Monday, Inspector General of Government Irene Mulyagonja said whereas the nature of corruption changes every day, there is a need to create strong networks within the region, to fight the vice.

Mulyagonja said Uganda for example, loses sh700b annually to corruption. This she said is mainly through the abuse of public funds and the procurement of substandard goods and services which creates a challenge to the economic development of the country and the region at large.

 eft to right  pimbi zone program technical advisor iz arah irungi president asset recovery interagency network for ast frica uliet mule regional coordinator ast and outh frica and  rene ulyagonja the inspector eneral of overnment interacting with during  a photo session (Left to right ) Opimbi Ozone, program technical advisor Giz, Sarah Birungi, president asset recovery inter-agency network for East Africa, Juliet mule, regional coordinator East and South Africa and Irene Mulyagonja, the inspector General of Government interacting during a photo session

 

 “As a region, we cannot allow this sort of corruption to continue unabated. We must begin to use best practices in the fight against corruption and follow the loot, trace it and deny the culprits the benefits of using it,” she said.

The IGG said the region needs to be ready to continue evolving to ensure that they are a step ahead of the culprits. “We must be ready to make the necessary changes in our laws in the detection and in enhanced strategies,” she said.

The Inspectorate of Government, established by the Inspector General of Government (IGG) statute in 1988, is an independent institution charged with the responsibility of eliminating corruption, abuse of authority and of public office.  

Speaking at the event, GIZ illicit financial flaws technical advisor Opimbi Osore, remarked that perceived functional institutions that should be investigating crime are often denied finances, calling upon governments to increase funding.            

 “The traditional development destinations have become an easy target for criminals. We, therefore, need to have a conversation on the trends, risks, and measures to tackle illicit financial flows,” Osore said.

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