TOP

Uganda wins global veterinary award

By Douglas Mubiru

Added 19th November 2019 02:26 PM

The World Veterinary Association (WVA) recently awarded Uganda the World Veterinary Day award 2019 citing interventions to improve animal health, welfare and public health.

Uvawin 703x422

Dr. Ronald Bameka, the executive member of UVA unveiling the World Veterinary Day award 2019 that Ugandan vets won. (Photo by Douglas Mubiru)

The World Veterinary Association (WVA) recently awarded Uganda the World Veterinary Day award 2019 citing interventions to improve animal health, welfare and public health.

Uganda has received a global award in recognition of the country’s efforts to improve animal health and welfare.

The World Veterinary Association (WVA) recently awarded Uganda the World Veterinary Day award 2019 citing interventions to improve animal health, welfare and public health.

The global association which comprises of veterinary experts announced Uganda as the winner of this year’s award during a conference in Kampala.

It is the second time that Uganda has won the award which was handed to the Uganda Veterinary Association (UVA), the umbrella body of veterinary doctors. Uganda won the award last year.

Dr. Sylvia Baluka, the UVA president said Uganda’s efforts to improve animal health and welfare including vaccination contributed to the success.

World Veterinary Day is celebrated annually on the last Saturday of April to recognize the work of veterinarians around the globe.

“The winners of the award must be the most successful contributors in the veterinary profession on the selected annual theme, which was ‘Value of vaccination,’ which Ugandan vets did and we are now the universal winners,” Baluka said.

She explained that vaccination is an essential tool for preventive veterinary medicine, promotion of animal health, welfare and reducing the risk of human exposure to many zoonotic pathogens.

Dr. Ronald Bameka, the executive member of UVA said it was the first time WVD award to be given to the same organization in consecutive years.

“We now have a world record for consecutively winning this award; we won it in 2018, and then this year. The award was accompanied with $2,500 or over sh9m,” Bameka said.

He explained that veterinarians contribute to the prevention of potentially harmful disease risks that could have adverse effects on human health.

“Vet professionals also help to ensure that Uganda’s growing human population has access to safe and high-quality animal source foods in drought conditions,” he added.

Bameka urged all the qualified vets in the country to join UVA and work together to ensure that animal welfare challenges are addressed.

Veterinarians at the conference applauded the ministry of agriculture, animal industry and fisheries for supporting the profession.

 

Government is considering new reforms to improve production and quality of livestock resources where the country enjoys comparative advantage including cattle.

 

Cabinet last month approved the formation of a separate ministry of animal industry and the creation of a regulatory authority for vet drugs.

 

It also approved funding sh60b for five years to support the ministry of agriculture, animal industry and fisheries to institute a new mechanism for the veterinary drug regulation.

Related Articles

More From The Author

Related articles