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Schools in Acholi sub-region asked to be innovative

By Andrew Masinde

Added 30th March 2019 04:45 PM

The district inspector of schools Gulu district, David Oboc noted that the world today is looking for innovative people rather than good grades.

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The district inspector of schools Gulu district, Oboc addresses teachers. PHOTO: Andrew Masinde

The district inspector of schools Gulu district, David Oboc noted that the world today is looking for innovative people rather than good grades.

 
The district inspector of schools Gulu district, David Oboc has called upon schools to be innovative when teaching such that the children can compete favourably.
 
He noted that the world today is looking for innovative people rather than good grades.
 
Oboc was speaking during the Newspapers in Education (NiE) training on Saturday. 60 primary school teachers from Gulu and Amuru, including school heads, attended the training.
 
According to Oboc, several schools are forcing pupils to cram class notes in order to get first grades yet they cannot reason or articulate issues on their own.
 
Oboc said the practice is as a result of too much pressure on teachers to produce first grades, at the expense of pupil’s ability to reason.
 

 

 
Teachers read newspapers during the training
 
He noted that teachers can only leave a mark in society if they produce children who will innovate and invent new things. 
 
“This can only be realised if teachers begin being innovative when teaching,” he stated.
 
On newspapers, Oboc advised the schools that are receiving newspapers to take it as a rare opportunity that cannot be found anywhere.
 
“I have seen schools that use newspapers to excel and if you also do the same, Gulu and Amuru will be competing favourably with the rest of the country. Also, use the knowledge that you have acquired from the training and implement it in your schools,” he advised.
 
He thanked Vision Group and Save the Children for giving rural schools an opportunity to access  newspapers, and he hopes the program is going to have a positive impact on schools in the region.
 

 Teachers read newspapers 

John Eremu, the features editor advised the schools to form reading clubs to ensure that children learn to read newspapers so as to improve their confidence.
 
“As children continue to read before others, they will become confident and be able to articulate things in a different way. Let the pupils also form reading clubs were they can read for each other in the group,” he noted.
 
To the teachers, Eremu advised them to ensure that they use the newspaper as a teaching aid where there is no textbook.
 

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