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Saudi boosts citizen benefits to counter high taxes

By AFP

Added 6th January 2018 01:35 PM

Student stipends will be increased by 10 percent, an official statement said

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Student stipends will be increased by 10 percent, an official statement said

PIC: Since the taxes were biting, the aims to "soften the impact of economic reforms on Saudi households

SAUDI ARABIA - Saudi Arabia today announced that it had boosted stipends and benefits for citizens to cushion the impact of economic reforms including the kingdom's first ever taxes after an oil price slump.

Most working Saudi Arabians are employed by the state and, like nationals in other energy-flush Gulf monarchies, have long benefited from a generous welfare system.

After the 2014 oil market crash, Saudi Arabia as well as the neighbouring United Arab Emirates announced a five percent value-added tax on most goods and services which took effect at the start of this year.

In a move that aims to "soften the impact of economic reforms on Saudi households," King Salman issued a royal decree late Friday, ordering a 1,000 riyal ($267, €222) monthly living allowance for military personnel and public servants for a period of one year.

Student stipends will be increased by 10 percent, an official statement said.

The oil-rich Gulf has long been a tax-free haven for both high-income households and migrant labourers, who frequently rely on remittances to support their families back home.

But countries in the region have introduced a series of austerity measures over the past two years to boost revenues and cut spending as the slump in world oil prices led to ballooning budget deficits.

Saudi Arabia has also intensified efforts to boost employment of its own citizens.

The jobless rate among Saudis aged 15 to 24 stood at 32.6% last year, according to the International Labour Organisation.

Saudi Arabia posted an economic contraction in 2017 for the first time in eight years due to severe austerity measures.

AFP

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