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Govt to support Makerere's student tear-gas maker

By Billy Rwothungeyo

Added 24th October 2017 06:06 AM

Tumwesigye said over sh400m to be used to support the Mugarura and his projects.

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Elioda Tumwesigy, the Minister for Science, Technology and Innovation at Makerere University open day and exhibition. Photo by Agnes Nantabi

INNOVATION|TECHNOLOGY

Remember the Makerere University student who made headlines last year when he made teargas from what he claimed were locally available materials?

While some praised Samuel Mugarura’s ingenuity, others tried to stay away from him. In fact, Makerere University even disowned his innovation.

Well, it turns out Mugarura is winning minds after-all. Elioda Tumwesigye, the Minister for Science, Technology and Innovation has revealed that government is ready to support the innovative young man.

Speaking at the Open day and exhibition held at Makerere University’s college of engineering, design, art and technology on October 20th, the minister said Mugarura is going to benefit from the innovation fund.

“There was a student who developed teargas, but we found that he could also develop some other chemicals which can be used for other purposes, like if a girl is going to be raped, she can use it as pepper spray. We are going to support that student,” he said.

Tumwesigye said over sh400m to be used to support the Mugarura and his projects. The minister also revealed that government is set to support several other projects at Makerere University such as the solar pumps, sanitary pads, and food technology among other projects.

“Government through parliament has appropriated sh30b for the innovation fund. You may want to know that out of the sh30b, nearly sh7.5b is coming to Makerere,” he said.

The minister encouraged the students who participated in the open day to be more innovative and make more products.

“Participate in producing products of artificial intelligence, robotics to revolutionize our economy.”

He was however disappointed that the university does not organize competitions for the innovators, beyond the showcases.

“I was asking the principal, that after here (the open day), what next? Do students just shelve their innovations, go back to sit exams? I thought there would be some sort of competition here, with judges, so we see how we can support the best three,” he said.

“Try to get a criteria (for judging), and we see how we can support some of these projects.”

 

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