TOP
Friday,September 21,2018 20:07 PM
  • Home
  • Opinion
  • Crime prevention and state responsibility

Crime prevention and state responsibility

By Admin

Added 29th April 2016 10:51 AM

The Constitution of the Republic of Uganda (1995) provides for the establishment and operation of a number of key law enforcement agencies with a view to addressing the several facets of crime in this country.

Isabellabwire 703x422

Isabella Bwiire

The Constitution of the Republic of Uganda (1995) provides for the establishment and operation of a number of key law enforcement agencies with a view to addressing the several facets of crime in this country.

By Isabella Bwiire

Crime is as old as mankind and given the further fact that there is hardly no crime free society on earth, many law enforcement agencies in more developed countries have opted for term “crime reduction” as opposed to “crime prevention” in recognition of the fact that it is quite difficult-nigh impossible to prevent prevalence of crime in society.

In the result, they would rather dedicate their energies, resources and technologies in crime reduction ventures than engage preventing the crime scourge. The above notwithstanding, it does not mean that efforts as law enforcement agencies have been compromised to stamp out certain crimes where possible.

The Constitution of the Republic of Uganda (1995) provides for the establishment and operation of a number of key law enforcement agencies with a view to addressing the several facets of crime in this country.

Article 211 of the said Constitution establishes the Uganda Police Force and Article 212 thereof outlines the core functions of the force as being the protection of life and property, preservation of life and order, prevention and detection of crime and co-operation with civilian authority and security organs as by law established.

The Police force is at the forefront of crime prevention in partnership with other law enforcement agencies in the county.

Uganda’s history is characterised by many years of political instability, civil strife and wars, large quantities of firearms and munitions have fallen in wrong hands boosting the rising levels of violent crimes; murder, robbery, treason and terrorism, trafficking etc.

The positive economic growth rates experienced in this country over the recent years has translated into an increase in availability of valuable materials possessions. In line with the criminal opportunity approach, the greater the number of commodities possessed by household, the greater the volume of crime against property.

Crime in this country has been on the increase. Such crimes include cybercrimes etc.

However, most of the constraints faced by most law enforcement agencies and partners in their quest to fight crime are pursed on insuffiencient funding, logistics and trained manpower. As a result, policing has for example become predominantly re-active rather than pro-active.

Another key factor contributing to the problems of law enforcement agencies is the citizen’s unwillingness to report crime. A more disturbing trend in this country is that only a small population of all crime ever gets to be reported to the Police and other security organs.

In conclusion, prevalence of high levels of crime does not only mar the image of law enforcement agencies but also destabilises the peace and security of the country and eats at the hearts (erodes) of our “nascent” democracy. Indeed the ability to control crime and safeguard the lives and property of the people is of paramount importance in any civilised society.

The writer works with the Foundation for Human Rights Initiative


Related Articles

More From The Author

Related articles