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Cricket charity still going strong

By Charles Mutebi

Added 26th February 2016 04:51 PM

"It's estimated that 100,000 people in Uganda currently have HIV and there are also 100,000 AIDS orphans in the country."

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Cricket Without Boarders (CWB) uses cricket as a tool in the fight against AIDS

"It's estimated that 100,000 people in Uganda currently have HIV and there are also 100,000 AIDS orphans in the country."

 

Cricket Without Boarders (CWB) remain committed to doing charity work in Uganda 10 years after their maiden outreach in the country.

Next month will consequently see English cricket coach Liam Stubbs visit the country on the usual mission to spread HIV and AIDS awareness through the Gentleman's game.

Stubbs is expected in Uganda on March 12 and will travel to Lugazi, Kasese and Fort Portal for coaching clinics in addition to donating cricket kit and equipment.

Stubbs, who hails from Middlesbrough, is undergoing level two coaching studies and is currently the youth coach of Welsh club Monmouth Cricket Club.

Stubbs has been collecting donations of old cricket kit and equipment from the Monmouth area besides his fund-raising drive for of £975. He has raised funds by holding a quiz night at the Queen's Head, a match at the club between a CWB XI and Monmouth as well as a parent and child game which featured several mums.

His work colleagues Emily Blease and Eleanor Jennings have also completed a sponsored parachute jump to raise funds.

"The placement will help us support local coaches and ambassadors to help children in Uganda make positive health decisions and grow the game of cricket," said Stubbs, who has been coaching Monmouth under 9s since 2013.

"Crucially, CWB also uses cricket as a tool in the fight against AIDS. CWB's training sessions have, at their heart, discussion about the disease in terms of prevention, treatment and equality of treatment.

"It's estimated that 100,000 people in Uganda currently have HIV and there are also 100,000 AIDS orphans in the country.

"Helping diagnose HIV and help with treatment can, in some cases, give people a normal life-span despite them suffering with AIDS."

Since the three CWB trustees set off on an African cricket adventure in 2005, CWB has coached more than 180,000 children, promoting key health messages and inclusiveness in seven African countries.

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