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Tuesday,October 15,2019 01:45 AM

Health Talk

By Vision Reporter

Added 6th March 2007 03:00 AM

Ugandan kids malnourished
KAMPALA - Sixty percent of childhood deaths in Uganda are associated with malnutrition, Dr. Jessica Jitta, a child health expert has said.

Ugandan kids malnourished
KAMPALA - Sixty percent of childhood deaths in Uganda are associated with malnutrition, Dr. Jessica Jitta, a child health expert has said. Jitta, who works with Makerere University Development Centre said two out of every five children in the country suffer from severe chronic protein malnutrition. “Twenty eight percent of children under-five suffer Vitamin A deficiency. Fifty percent of under-fives have anaemia, a third of which is due to lack of Iron.” Jitta was presenting a review on Child Days Plus Strategy to the health ministry stakeholders last week at the Grand Imperial Hotel. The strategy was initiated in 2004 to curb child mortality and morbidity through immunisation, de-worming, mass drug administration and provision of nutrients such as vitamins among women and infants.

UNAS’ first publication

KAMPALA - The Uganda National Academy of Sciences (UNAS) launched its first publication, Partnering for Science in Uganda: Establishing the Forum on Health and Nutrition, recently. The chairman, Prof Edward Kirumira, says it heralds the beginning of a new era in the policy-making process of Uganda. The publication was launched recently at Hotel Equatoria. UNAS is a body of scientists with diverse expertise, whose goal is to offer expertise, independent and evidence-based advice to government, policy makers and other organisations.

UN discusses circumcision

INTERNATIONAL - United Nations health agencies have convened an international meeting of AIDS experts to examine the latest findings that male circumcision cuts the risk of HIV infection in men. The research which was carried out in Kenya and Uganda revealed that circumcision reduces HIV infection among heterosexuals by up to 60%. According to WHO and UNAIDS officials, the consultation will address a range of policy, operational and ethical issues that will help guide decisions about where and how male circumcision can be best implemented, promoted and safely performed. The details of the trials were published in the British medical journal The Lancet. Experts say proper guidelines are necessary to prevent people from developing a false sense of security.

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