Family
Winnie launches legal claim to Mandela's home
Publish Date: Aug 05, 2014
Winnie launches legal claim to Mandela's home
The ex-wife of Nelson Mandela has launched a legal claim to the rural home of the fallen icon
  • mail
  • img
newvision


JOHANNESBURG - Nelson Mandela's ex-wife Winnie Madikizela-Mandela has launched a legal claim to the former South African leader's rural home, local media reported on Tuesday.

Her lawyers said in a letter quoted by the Daily Dispatch newspaper that since the house in Qunu was bought while the two were still married, traditional custom dictated it should be inherited by Madikizela-Mandela and their children.

"This position becomes applicable irrespective of whether the wife was divorced or not," lawyer Mvuyo Notyesi wrote in the letter dated July 18 -- the late leader's birthday which is celebrated internationally as Mandela Day.

"In fact, the property in question was obtained by Mrs Madikizela-Mandela whilst the husband was in prison."

Madikizela-Mandela was divorced from the Nobel peace laureate in 1996 and was not named in his will.
 


Winnie and the late Nelson Mandela during their visit to Uganda


Mandela spent 27 years in apartheid jails before becoming South Africa's first black president in the post-apartheid elections of 1994.

"The view we hold is that the... property belongs to the generation of Mr Nelson Mandela and Mrs Winnie Madikizela-Mandela as their common and parental home," said Notyesi.

Mandela's $4.3-million (3.2-million-euro) estate was released in February, two months after his death, and left his assets to various family members, personal staff, schools and the ruling African National Congress party.

His third wife Graca Machel received four properties in her native Mozambique as well as cars, art work, and jewellery -- many of which were her own assets that she brought to their marriage.
 


Mandela married Machel, the widow of Mozambique president Samora Machel, in 1998.

In the will, Mandela left his property in Qunu to the family trust "for the benefit of the Mandela family and my third wife and her two children".

The lawyers' letter said Madikizela-Mandela's legal bid was neither attacking nor contesting the will but was "only asserting the traditional and customary rights on what may be contentious in the future".

AFP

The statements, comments, or opinions expressed through the use of New Vision Online are those of their respective authors, who are solely responsible for them, and do not necessarily represent the views held by the staff and management of New Vision Online.

New Vision Online reserves the right to moderate, publish or delete a post without warning or consultation with the author.Find out why we moderate comments. For any questions please contact digital@newvision.co.ug

  • mail
  • img
blog comments powered by Disqus
Also In This Section
Bonuses won’t solve all your financial challenges
It is not unusual for employees to take for granted the power of money that is within their reach....
Managing money when you start earning
Every income-earner has to decide whether to save, invest or spend on needs/wants and obligations....
When should a mother lose rights over her child?
Health reports indicate that more than 6,000 women die every year due to pregnancy or childbirth-related problems....
Our fathers have defiled us, whom should we turn to?
So many untold stories, of girls as young as four years being defiled by their biological fathers, and left to rot....
Census: Uganda far from Uhuru
The provisional results of the recent census are out, but what do they mean? Paul Busharizi breaks it down....
New book claims Jesus married and had children
A new book launched in London claims to have fresh evidence that Jesus married and had children with Mary Magdalene....
Do you agree with the ban on the export of maids?
Yes
No
Can't Say
follow us
subscribe to our news letter