Opinion
Piglets at parliament!
Publish Date: Jun 25, 2014
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By Josepha Jabo

On Tuesday, June 17, 2014, a pair of piglets, painted yellow, was dumped at Parliament. One of the piglets had a name tag, with the words, ‘M. Pigs Corruption Constituency’ written on it.

The meaning was not lost, regarding the symbolism of yellow paint, as it is widely known that yellow is the color used by the National Resistance Movement (NRM) party.  

However, these youths act is one-sided affair as it points a finger at the NRM party as the perpetrators of corruption in this country and exonerates other political parties.  

While the NRM does have the majority of members in Parliament, Parliament is not only comprised of NRM MPs but other political parties as well such as the Independents and the Opposition. When they debate in the Plenary, they do so collectively, therefore, sharing collective responsibility.

So, if these youths want to insinuate that yellow is the color of corruption, then they are wrong and they should have either included colors of other political parties in their paint job or not painted the piglets any color at all!

This deed was reminiscent of May 2013, when a herd of bloody pigs were placed outside Kenya’s Parliament, by activists who were protesting their parliamentarians’ request for higher salaries.

The two Ugandan youths, who carried out this act claim to be members of an unemployed society called ‘The Jobless Brotherhood.’ So, instead of wasting their time dousing piglets in yellow paint, which is cruelty to animals, these youth should go job-hunting or, since they are so creative, redirect their creativity to invent an innovative way of earning an income for themselves.

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