Science & technology
Forget apps, old-school mobiles ring in a comebackPublish Date: May 26, 2014
Forget apps, old-school mobiles ring in a comeback
  • mail
  • img
An Ericsson mobile phone
newvision


They fit in a pocket, have batteries that last all week and are almost indestructible: old-school Nokias, Ericssons and Motorolas are making a comeback as consumers tired of fragile and overly-wired smartphones go retro.


Forget apps, video calls and smiley faces, handsets like the Nokia 3310 or the Motorola StarTec 130 allows just basic text messaging and phone calls.

But demand for them is growing and some of these second-hand models are fetching prices as high as 1,000 euros a piece.

"Some people don't blink at the prices, we have models at more than 1,000 euros. The high prices are due to the difficulty in finding those models, which were limited editions in their time," said Djassem Haddad, who started the site vintagemobile.fr in 2009.

Haddad had been eyeing a niche market, but since last year, sales have taken off, he said.

Over the past two to three years, he has sold some 10,000 handsets, "with a real acceleration from the beginning of 2013".

"The ageing population is looking for simpler phones, while other consumers want a second cheap phone," he said.

Among the top-sellers on the website is the Nokia 8210, with a tiny monochrome screen and plastic buttons, at 59.99 euros.

Ironically, the trend is just starting as the telecommunications industry consigns such handsets to the recycling bins, hailing smartphones as the way ahead.

Finnish giant Nokia, which was undisputedly the biggest mobile phone company before the advent of Apple's iPhone or Samsung's Galaxy, offloaded its handset division to Microsoft this year after failing to catch the smartphone wave.

But it was probably also the supposedly irreversible switch towards smartphone that has given the old school phone an unexpected boost.

- 'Back to basics' -

For Damien Douani, an expert on new technologies at FaDa agency, it is simply trendy now to be using the retro phone.

There is "a great sensation of finding an object that we knew during another era -- a little like paying for vintage sneakers that we couldn't afford when we were teenagers," Douani told AFP.

There is also "a logic of counter-culture in reaction to the over-connectedness of today's society, with disconnection being the current trend."

"That includes the need to return to what is essential and a basic telephone that is used only for making phone calls and sending SMSes," he added.

It is also about "being different. Today, everyone has a smartphone that looks just like another, while ten years ago, brands were much more creative".

It is a mostly high-end clientele that is shopping at French online shop Lekki, which sells "a range of vintage, revamped mobile phones".

 

The statements, comments, or opinions expressed through the use of New Vision Online are those of their respective authors, who are solely responsible for them, and do not necessarily represent the views held by the staff and management of New Vision Online.

New Vision Online reserves the right to moderate, publish or delete a post without warning or consultation with the author.Find out why we moderate comments. For any questions please contact digital@newvision.co.ug

  • mail
  • img
blog comments powered by Disqus
Also In This Section
Facebook and Uber talk integration
MARK Zuckerberg has held preliminary talks with Uber CEO Travis Kalanick about potentially embedding the service into the Facebook Messenger app, according to sources...
OS X Yosemite public beta arrives
ON Thursday, fall came early for hundreds of thousands of Mac users as Apple released its first public beta of OS X Yosemite...
Foursquare rebrands, unveils new logo
SOCIAL media app Foursquare announced a major rebranding, shifting its app away from "checking in" at certain locations around the world, and focusing more on helping users search for nearby places...
Nokia reports renaissance
Finnish telecom equipment group Nokia jumped back into profit in the second quarter, it reported on Thursday, boosted by restructuring after it lost its leading position in handsets and sold its phone division to Microsoft....
LG Electronics profit surges 165%
LG Electronics posted a 165 percent surge in second-quarter net profit Thursday from a year ago, on solid TV sales and a dramatic turnaround in its long-troubled mobile unit....
Android grabs larger tablet market share
GLOBAL sales of tablet computers edged higher in the second quarter, in the slowest growth since 2009, research firm Strategy Analytics revealed...
Should government review powers of kings?
Yes
No
Can't Say
follow us
subscribe to our news letter