World
High court stops Malawi's Banda from halting poll
Publish Date: May 25, 2014
High court stops Malawi's Banda from halting poll
Banda votes two days ago. She says polls were rigged.
  • mail
  • img
newvision

BLANTYRE - Hours after President Joyce Banda declared this week's election "null and void", Malawi's high court issued an injunction stopping her decision to annull the poll.
 
Banda, who has claimed there were "serious irregularities" with the poll, declared fresh elections should be held within 90 days but said she would not stand as a candidate, to "give Malawians a free and fair" election.
 
 
The injunction was granted after a lawyer for the Malawi Electoral Commission applied to the court to quash Banda's decision, asking whether she had any "mandate, constitutional or statutory to interfere with electoral process."
 
Banda's main rival Peter Mutharika said the decision to annul the election was "illegal".
 
"Nothing in the constitution gives the president powers to cancel an election," said Mutharika, who partial results showed was well ahead of Banda in the polls. "This is clearly illegal, unconstitutional and not acceptable."
 
There were chaotic scenes at the tally centre in Blantyre when word went around that the poll had been nullified, with police ordering a shutdown of the centre.
 
European Union election observers urged "political parties, supporters and other stakeholders to remain calm" and allow the electoral commission "to finalise its task on tabulation and announcement of results."
 
Banda has alleged people had voted multiple times, ballots had been tampered with, presiding officers arrested, and the computerised voter counting system collapsed.
 
Her supporters have alleged that Mutharika -- who is already facing pre-election treason charges -- may be behind the irregularities.
 
With about a third of the votes counted Mutharika, 74, had 42 percent of the vote, while Banda has 23 percent, according to preliminary results announced by the electoral commission late on Friday.
 
Mutharika is the brother of late president Bingu wa Mutharika, who died in office two years ago.
 
He allegedly attempted to conceal his brother's death by flying his body to South Africa in a bid to prevent then vice president Banda from coming to power as the constitution decreed.
 
That lead to treason charges against him.
 
On Saturday he did not claim victory but said the "people have spoken and this was a free and credible election."
 
"I hope the president abandons the path she has taken," Mutharika said. "As citizens we should not take this country on the path of destruction and everyone should remain calm until results are announced."
 
"Whoever has won should take over the government and start the process of rebuilding the country."
 
Darling of the West 
 
After Mutharika's corruption-tainted eight-year rule, Banda was feted by the West as one of Africa's rare women leaders, even receiving a high profile visit from then US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.
 
But her government has since been ensnared in a $30 million government corruption scandal dubbed "Cashgate" that has seen foreign donors freeze badly needed aid.
 
That aid is likely to remained frozen as long as the current crisis continues.
 
Voting had been scheduled to take place on Tuesday, but was extended through to Thursday when delays of up to ten hours prompted riots in the commercial capital Blantyre, where the army was deployed.
 
Banda's request for an audit was rebuffed by the country's electoral commission chief, who told AFP that despite problems with the electronic counting system, the tally was continuing manually.
 
Maxon Mbendera insisted the election was "valid" and said Banda's claim was caused by "desperation".
 
Kenneth Msonda, a spokesman for Banda's People's Party, told AFP conceding defeat was not the issue. "Why concede defeat when anomalies have not been rectified?"
 
Msonda said the electoral process had been "marred by a lot of irregularities on vote tabulation. We have won this election, otherwise we demand a stop to the tabulation of the results until all anomalies are corrected," Msonda said.
 
AFP

The statements, comments, or opinions expressed through the use of New Vision Online are those of their respective authors, who are solely responsible for them, and do not necessarily represent the views held by the staff and management of New Vision Online.

New Vision Online reserves the right to moderate, publish or delete a post without warning or consultation with the author.Find out why we moderate comments. For any questions please contact digital@newvision.co.ug

  • mail
  • img
blog comments powered by Disqus
Also In This Section
Libya magnet for jihadists from Tunisia and beyond
Lawless Libya has become a magnet for radical militants who receive weapons training in jihadist camps before launching deadly attacks in other countries, like last week''s beach massacre in Tunisia....
A French judicial probe has found a series of "tragic" errors caused an Air Algerie plane to crash in the Malian desert last year....
Mass killings may be contagious - US study
Mass killings in the US may be contagious, according to a study that found each deadly tragedy can increase the likelihood that another will soon follow....
Two years after Morsi, Egypt stuck in turmoil
Two years after the army deposed president Mohamed Morsi, Egypt is roiled by brazen Islamic State group attacks in the Sinai Peninsula....
No racial motivation in US church fires
FIRES at six African-American churches in the southern United States do not appear to be linked or racially motivated, officials said...
Hollande warns entering
French President Francois Hollande warned Thursday that Europe would be entering "unknown" territory if Greeks voted against tough austerity conditions attached to a bailout in a make-or-break referendum....
Do you think Ugandan graduates are the worst in the region?
Yes
No
Can't Say
follow us
subscribe to our news letter