Science & technology
'Ununseptium' - Periodic Table’s 117th Element
Publish Date: May 04, 2014
'Ununseptium' - Periodic Table’s 117th Element
This 394-feet-long tube accelerated calcium ions to produce element 117 in Germany. Photo: Universitaet Mainz
  • mail
  • img
newvision

A new super heavy element, “Ununseptium” was created in a German laboratory by a team of physicists, chemists and researchers from Australian National University (ANU). It is going to be the 117th element of the periodic table.

It was back in the year, 2010 when the discovery of element 117 was first announced. The original experiment was repeated in 2012. The study was, however, published in the Physical Review Letters, an U.S. journal.

The present experiment was performed by the scientists at the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, an accelerator laboratory located in Darm-stadt, Germany.

In this experiment, a berkelium target with calcium ions were bombarded by scientists until they collided and formed element 117, that further decayed into elements 113 and 115.Scientists produced it during an 18-month-long period.

This involved intense neutron irradiation at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in U.S., followed by chemical separation and purification at ORNL’s Radiochemical Engineering Development Center.

As a matter of fact, more the number of protons and neutrons are added into an atomic nucleus, the more unstable an atom becomes. The life span of most super-heavy elements, before undergoing decay, is just microseconds or nanoseconds.

The present success in making element 117 can be considered as an important step in the path of producing and detecting super-heavy elements on the “island of stability”.

According to Thom Mason, the director of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the trick lies in understanding the quantum physics going on when the reaction takes place to form these new elements and try, if possible, to work out the way and how to proceed to elements 119 and 120.

The implications from the discovery of the afore-mentioned element are uncountable. Its’ status as an element will soon be decided by a committee from the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC).

The statements, comments, or opinions expressed through the use of New Vision Online are those of their respective authors, who are solely responsible for them, and do not necessarily represent the views held by the staff and management of New Vision Online.

New Vision Online reserves the right to moderate, publish or delete a post without warning or consultation with the author.Find out why we moderate comments. For any questions please contact digital@newvision.co.ug

  • mail
  • img
blog comments powered by Disqus
Also In This Section
Nintendo logs $132 million first-half net profit
Japanese videogame giant Nintendo said Wednesday its first-half net profit soared to $132 million as a sharply weaker yen boosted its bottom line and offset slowing sales....
Mobile app helps track Ebola epidemic
A new mobile telephone based mapping service has been created in a bid to track Ebola and better help communities hit by the virus in west Africa, developers said Monday....
Scientists revive giant virus from 30,000-year-old Siberian permafrost
French and Russian researchers have revived a 30,000-year-old living virus from deep below the frozen Siberian tundra...
Orbital rocket explodes after launch
An unmanned rocket explodes in a giant fireball and plummets back to Earth just seconds after launch....
Facebook shares dive as social network eyes future
Facebook Tuesday reported its quarterly profit nearly doubled but saw its stock pounded after outlining a plan to invest heavily in the future instead of revelling in short-term riches....
IBM offers analytics platform for Ebola fight
IBM announced Monday it would offer its analytics platform and other technology for use in African countries affected by the Ebola outbreak....
Should the absence of bride price prevent couples from wedding?
Yes
No
Can't Say
follow us
subscribe to our news letter