Science & technology
'Ununseptium' - Periodic Table’s 117th Element
Publish Date: May 04, 2014
'Ununseptium' - Periodic Table’s 117th Element
This 394-feet-long tube accelerated calcium ions to produce element 117 in Germany. Photo: Universitaet Mainz
  • mail
  • img
newvision

A new super heavy element, “Ununseptium” was created in a German laboratory by a team of physicists, chemists and researchers from Australian National University (ANU). It is going to be the 117th element of the periodic table.

It was back in the year, 2010 when the discovery of element 117 was first announced. The original experiment was repeated in 2012. The study was, however, published in the Physical Review Letters, an U.S. journal.

The present experiment was performed by the scientists at the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, an accelerator laboratory located in Darm-stadt, Germany.

In this experiment, a berkelium target with calcium ions were bombarded by scientists until they collided and formed element 117, that further decayed into elements 113 and 115.Scientists produced it during an 18-month-long period.

This involved intense neutron irradiation at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in U.S., followed by chemical separation and purification at ORNL’s Radiochemical Engineering Development Center.

As a matter of fact, more the number of protons and neutrons are added into an atomic nucleus, the more unstable an atom becomes. The life span of most super-heavy elements, before undergoing decay, is just microseconds or nanoseconds.

The present success in making element 117 can be considered as an important step in the path of producing and detecting super-heavy elements on the “island of stability”.

According to Thom Mason, the director of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the trick lies in understanding the quantum physics going on when the reaction takes place to form these new elements and try, if possible, to work out the way and how to proceed to elements 119 and 120.

The implications from the discovery of the afore-mentioned element are uncountable. Its’ status as an element will soon be decided by a committee from the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC).

The statements, comments, or opinions expressed through the use of New Vision Online are those of their respective authors, who are solely responsible for them, and do not necessarily represent the views held by the staff and management of New Vision Online.

New Vision Online reserves the right to moderate, publish or delete a post without warning or consultation with the author.Find out why we moderate comments. For any questions please contact digital@newvision.co.ug

  • mail
  • img
blog comments powered by Disqus
Also In This Section
Blockbuster military shooter video game "Call of Duty" has blasted past $10 billion in lifetime sales, propelled by demand for the latest installment in the 11-year-old franchise....
Facebook
Facebook's move to fulfill its ambition to be the personal "newspaper" for its billion-plus members is likely to mean more woes for the ailing news media....
Can robots help stop the Ebola outbreak?
The US military has enlisted a new germ-killing weapon in the fight against Ebola - a four-wheeled robot that can disinfect a room in minutes with pulses of ultraviolet light....
Twitter boss launches global cash register service
Twitter's co-founder outlined plans to make cash registers a thing of the past on Thursday as he held a global launch for new software that he said would help small businesses grow....
Judge approves $450 mn deal in Apple ebook suit
A US judge signed off Friday on Apple's $450 million legal deal to compensate consumers harmed by an illegal price-fixing conspiracy for electronic books....
Google tests replacing web ads with contributions
Google began rolling out a way for people to support websites they frequent and, in return, be rewarded with ad-free pages....
Should Govt lease parts of Lake Victoria to private developers?
Its Ok
No Way
Not Sure
follow us
subscribe to our news letter