Lessons learned from Katikkiro's mobilisation
Publish Date: Apr 25, 2014
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By Richard Kabanda

I never wanted to write any article praising the great work done by the Katikkiro of Buganda and his team because some people would say, ‘we expected that from you’.

From the time I met Oweek. Mayiga, way back when he was still a minister, I saw a man who had the potential to move mountains but had little politico-cultural power (then) to shove his plans.

In our culture, you can never know who will be the next Katikkiro since it is only the Kabaka with that mandate. His appointment excited the youth because they expected him to succeed in his tasks.

Embarking on his mobilisation strategy, there is a lot we need to learn that will help us leave our communities empowered.

First, the Katikkiro has moved with a team majority of which are young men and women below 45years. The point is, trusting people of young age is a strategy many organisations including government have not tapped or if so, they have exercised it at a smaller scale.

We should note that approximately 65% of Uganda’s population is composed of the young people; trusting them gives them chance to prove to their masters how well work can be done, accomplishment of multiple tasks is always timely as well as glooming them to fully take charge of their state.

Secondly, the work done by the business community is a sign that people in business once given opportunity can attest to their people that, not only do they mind about money, but rather have a big stake and a role to play in the affairs of the state. This big resource has always been silently utilised during political waves in the country, but not utilised for other socio-economic and corporate responsibilities in our communities.

Thirdly, the aspect of ownership of the Kasubi tombs has been fully captured through this mobilisation. It is evident that today, the people of Buganda and Uganda in general, have a big stake in the tombs than ever before. Those without historical possessions would say it is a blessing in disguise, forgetting that Buganda Kingdom is one of the few historical powerful kingdoms in Africa, and of which its treasure we should keep for all other generations.

Fourthly, is a question of leadership. The task of completing the tombs construction has always been pending and dragging on; my gratitude goes to the Kabaka for the plausible, vibrant and vigilant new leadership.

Fifthly, the contribution of sh150m from the exceptionally low income earners of Ssembabule, Kiboga and Kyankwazi, sh90m, Butambala, sh90m, Kayunga, Buddu and many others, is a sign of love, trust and self-driven willingness to support the kingdom and the Kabaka. We appreciate!

Lastly, I now understand that the biggest weapon we need on earth are the people of value who are very key and instrumental in the struggle.

In the youth we see the light and the candle never loses its light by lighting another.

Long Live Your Majesty

The writer is the Chairman Buganda Youth Council and a member of The Buganda Great Lukiiko representing the youths

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