National
Chinese, trapped in one-child web, give babies away
Publish Date: Apr 01, 2014
Chinese, trapped in one-child web, give babies away
  • mail
  • img
newvision

GANZHOU, China - Lu Libing knew he had only one choice as the birth of his third child approached. He couldn't afford hefty fines that would be meted out by Chinese authorities, so he put the unborn child up for adoption.

On the Internet he found "A Home Where Dreams Come True", a website touted as China's biggest online adoption forum, part of an industry that has been largely unregulated for years.

Expectant couples, unwilling or unable to keep their children, go to the website looking for adoptive parents rather than abort their babies or abandon them.

There are no clear statistics on how many people use these websites but "A Home Where Dreams Come True" said 37,841 babies had been adopted through its website from 2007 to August 2012.

More than 380 babies were rescued and 1,094 people arrested when the government cracked down on the industry last month. Adoption websites such as "A Home Where Dreams Come True", whose founder was arrested, were shut because they were deemed illegal and responsible for the trafficking of babies.

An official with China's state-run adoption agency, the China Centre for Children's Welfare and Adoption, said parents could apply to the civil affairs ministry to give up children.

The official, who declined to be identified, said it was "definitely wrong" to use websites.

"These are children, not commodities," the official said.

Baby trafficking has been a perennial problem in China and recent reports on online trafficking rings show how an underground industry has made use of the Internet to connect people quickly, making it easier to buy and sell babies. This has presented a new challenge for the government.

Demand for such websites has been fuelled by rural poverty, China's one-child policy, limiting most couples of only one child, and desperate, childless couples.

Lu, 30, who asked to use a pseudonym for fear of official retribution, lives on the outskirts of Ganzhou in southern Jiangxi province, a barren place scarred by water contamination and heavy metal pollution.

He and his wife, Mu, live from hand to mouth in a two-bedroom home in an unfinished block. Their two children, aged two-and-a-half and 10 months, live with Lu's parents in northern Shaanxi province.

"SEEKING HONEST FAMILIES"

He says he would have to pay family planning fines of about 50,000 yuan to 80,000 yuan ($8,000-$12,800) for the third child, more than 10 times his monthly income.

Mu is five months pregnant. Lu wrote on his first post on the website on February 24 that he could not raise the child and was "seeking honest families who are willing to adopt".

The post drew 40 responses. During his interview with Reuters he received a call from a prospective adoptive mother who was worried he may have been arrested after state media reported on the crackdown earlier that day.

Lu said there was no hope of sending the new child to school or paying the necessary fines to secure a "hukou", or household registration. Failure to pay would make his baby an undocumented "black child" with no access to schooling or healthcare.

Baby trafficking has been encouraged by the one-child policy and a traditional bias for sons, who support elderly parents and continue the family name, leading to the abandonment of girls. Even as China starts to relax the one-child policy, allowing millions of families to have a second child, it still penalizes people who flout the rules.

Traffickers have often resorted to kidnapping. In late February, state news agency Xinhua warned parents to guard against kidnappers who could pose as nurses in hospitals or lie in wait outside school gates.

Reuters

 

The statements, comments, or opinions expressed through the use of New Vision Online are those of their respective authors, who are solely responsible for them, and do not necessarily represent the views held by the staff and management of New Vision Online.

New Vision Online reserves the right to moderate, publish or delete a post without warning or consultation with the author.Find out why we moderate comments. For any questions please contact digital@newvision.co.ug

  • mail
  • img
blog comments powered by Disqus
Also In This Section
Make no mistakes during Pope’s visit -Kasingye
The director Interpol, Asan Kasingye has directed security agencies in Busia and Malaba to observe 24-hour surveillance and ensure no mistakes are made ahead of the Pope’s visit....
Cabinet recalls Namulonge land title
Cabinet has recalled a land title on Plot No 9, Block 158 Namulonge, Nakyesasa that has been granted to Premier Roses- a Ruparelia Group of Company, under the chairmanship of city tycoon Sudhir Ruparelia....
Nkozi University takes over Entrepreneural programme
Student Training for Entrepreneurial Promotion programme (STEP), which has been running at Uganda Martyrs’ University, Nkozi was on Thursday handed over to the University....
Kyambadde blames low quality of Uganda produce on farmers
Minister of Trade and Industry, Amelia Anne Kyambadde has blamed Ugandan farmers for causing the in quality of their produce as they dry them on bare ground full of soil, dust and stones that cause loss of 30% of the country’s revenue....
Gen Wamala visits injured soldiers in Nairobi
The Chief of Defence Forces of the Uganda People''s Defence Forces, Gen. Edward Katumba Wamala has flown from Mogadishu to Nairobi to visit the soldiers who got injured in the September 1, 2015 attack at Janale, Somalia....
One dead in Kisenyi fire
One person was killed by fire that gutted shacks in Kisenyi, a Kampala slum. Property worth millions of shillings was also destroyed leaving traders in tears....
Are poor parliamentary debates a result of removal of school debates?
Yes
No
Can't Say
follow us
subscribe to our news letter