Opinion
Farmers given raw deal in Uganda
Publish Date: Mar 26, 2014
newvision
  • mail
  • img

By Dan Okello

Agriculture is the driving engine of the Uganda’s economy. Liberalisation and globalisation have allowed and made free movement of goods and services possible all over the globe.

The Uganda Government also adopted the same liberalisation policy. However, a decline in prices of major export commodities as a result of globalisation and liberalisation directly affects local prices.

The Government is not doing enough for the peasant farmers in Uganda; their counterpart in Europe and America are heavily subsidised. The peasant farmers in Uganda have been abandoned To Whom It May Concern.
 

The Uganda peasant farmers sell their product at very low prices especially beans, maize, ground nuts, simsim because they fail to get good markets as a result of liberalisation and globalisation.
 

The peasant farmers in Uganda cannot compete globally. The immediate effect of liberalisation and globalisation is the growing gap between the rich 1% and the poor 99% in Uganda and it continues to widen.
 

It is high time the Government considered introducing policies which are pro-farmers. The Government should subsidise farmers' produce.
 

Indeed, this is what developed countries are doing in their countries. Agricultural production in Europe and America are heavily subsidised.
 

Developed countries give free tractors, seeds, fertilisers and other farm inputs to their farmers. Uganda peasant farmers have been abandoned and given a raw deal because of World Bank conditionality.
 

It has become increasingly clear that liberalisation is not sufficient condition for success. The policy of liberalisation has failed to improve the condition of agricultural producers until and unless the co-operative movement is revitalised through which the peasant farmers will be able to participate in the global trade and the state starts to take more active roles in its promotion and development.
 

The National Agricultural Advisory Services (NAADS) failed because it failed to use the farmer's co-operatives. I am disappointed that the majority of the co-operative unions in Uganda have collapsed.

I would like Ugandans to believe that the debate on the role of the co-operative movement in the development process must be brought back to centre stage.
 

Africa in general and Uganda in particular cannot afford to abandon the co-operative movement as a means of mobilising rural production.
 

The writer is the UPC chairman for Lira District

The statements, comments, or opinions expressed through the use of New Vision Online are those of their respective authors, who are solely responsible for them, and do not necessarily represent the views held by the staff and management of New Vision Online.

New Vision Online reserves the right to moderate, publish or delete a post without warning or consultation with the author.Find out why we moderate comments. For any questions please contact digital@newvision.co.ug

  • mail
  • img
blog comments powered by Disqus
Also In This Section
Congratulatory message from the president of the Republic of Turkey
On Wednesday, October 29, Turkey clebrated its 91st Anniversary of the proclamation of the Republic of Turkey....
Namugongo Museum: Uganda’s architecture too needs Martyrs
For their refusal to renounce Christianity, thirty-two young men of the Catholic and Anglican faiths were – on the orders of Kabaka Mwanga II of Buganda – burned to death on June 3, 1886 at Namugongo ....
Rank stupidity?
Blaise Cronin is Professor Emeritus of Information Science at Indiana University Bloomington, and Honorary Professor at City University London....
Uganda’s traffic woes
When you want to know that Uganda’s traffic system is dead, try walking through the ZEBRA Crossing....
The years of living tactically
We have been living in an illusion. For years, the world has believed that the transition from a unipolar to a multipolar order would be peaceful, orderly, and steady, with new players like China, Brazil, and Turkey adapting to the existing multilateral framework in a natural, harmonious way. How w...
Mineral certification: The genesis and steps Uganda ought to remember
On December 15, 2010, Uganda endorsed the ICGLR Lusaka Declaration adopting six tools to fight Illegal exploitation of natural resources in the Great Lakes Region....
Should the absence of bride price prevent couples from wedding?
Yes
No
Can't Say
follow us
subscribe to our news letter