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Cursillo movement leaders convene in Tororo
Publish Date: Mar 22, 2014
Cursillo movement leaders convene in Tororo
The visiting group visiting the Uganda Martyrs Shrine Namugongo on Wednesday. PHOTO/Juliet Lukwago
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By Juliet Lukwago             

TORORO - Leaders of the Cursillo Movement of Catholic Church (OMCC) from Gibraltar in Spain, Ireland, South Africa and other countries are gathering in Tororo Archdiocese for workshop on evangelization.

They arrived in Uganda Thursday last week, and visited Uganda Martyrs' Shrine Namugongo mid-this week to pay homage to the Uganda martyrs.

They are scheduled to congregate at Jinja Cathedral next week from Thursday until Sunday.

This movement, started in the 1940s, is run by Christians with the help of priests and works to assist followers to know their roles in Church.

‘Cursillo’ is Spanish for ‘short course’ and overall, the movement is often associated with a three-day weekend.

The leader of the team from Spain, Francis Napoli, admits that the concept of Cursillo remains “still somewhat” mystifying even for those who have experienced it.

“The reason behind the mystery is God,” he says.

“No one can fully explain how God touches each person in His special or unique way throughout the various elements of the Cursillo movement.”


The team is scheduled to congregate in Jinja next week, starting Thursday. PHOTO/Juliet Lukwago

In the movement, Napoli says, they approach evangelization as “a very natural act of being Christ-like within each of our daily activities”.

“We realize that while most people would like to live their lives in a Christ-like manner, the pressures of the world often make this difficult. The Cursillo Movement provides a method and a technique to provide each of us with the tools, the mentality, the strength, and the support to make this natural type of evangelization possible.”

According to Napoli, the movement can be useful in developing a deeper understanding of what it means to be fully Catholic by being fully Christian.

He also talks of the need for Christians to play their role in the Church with more seriousness.

He says: “We as laity in the Church can no longer take our role lightly. The future of our society is in our hands. We must realize that we, as individuals, can have a great impact on our society.

“More importantly, we can have an even greater impact when we find other individuals that are ready and able to accept the challenge.”

The movement has spread to more than 60 countries and more than five million people throughout the world.

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