Health
Global Fund to offer more flexible funding
Publish Date: Mar 07, 2014
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By Hope Mafaranga in Indonesia

International funding institution, The Global Fund has developed a new funding model to maximize the global fight against AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.


The new funding model would promote stronger public-private partnerships. The model required not only government involvement but also non-government institutions and private sector commitment.

The Chairperson of the Board of the Global Fund, Dr. Nafsiah Mboi, who is also Indonesia's minister of health, said that the change is deliberately strategic, financial and operational components of the Global Fund.

“We are working with all partners to stimulate support for the most effective ways to defeat AIDS, TB and malaria,” she said.
In the new system, countries are categorized in four bands, depending on the country’s economic growth and disease burden with the first band  where Uganda falls getting more money for HIV, TB and Malaria.

She said many countries are seeing great progress in prevention, treatment and care for people affected by the diseases.
“We can defeat these diseases by making more strategic decisions with increased impact. The new funding model gives all of us a fuller manifestation of partnership, which is the core of our organization,” she said.

At the launch of the Global Fund's replenishment in December 2013, more than US$12.0 billion was pledged for 2014-2016, the largest amount ever, and more contributions have been announced since then.

The board also decided on the initial allocation amount for the 2014-2016 periods, and allocation amounts will be calculated and communicated to countries by the end of March 2014.

The board chairperson added that there is need to build and strengthen health systems and protection of human rights.

The meeting also had many delegations and implementing partners discuss the anti- gay law that Uganda passed recently, urging Global Fund to put strong conditions on the grants that are given to countries with human rights violation.

 Other suggestions were also made that Global Fund should put its focus on private sector and ignore government agencies.

However, this sparked off many reactions as many delegations agreed that putting conditions will affect other groups like people living with HIV, affected by TB and Malaria.

One of the delegates from Uganda and sits on the Country Coordinating Mechanism Committee ( CCM) that is charged in writing concept notes and proposals said that if Global Fund does not give Uganda money because of passing the anti- gay law, it will be putting more people at risk of dying of HIV  and other related diseases.

“We cannot do without government agencies because we implement through their structures and putting conditions on the grants will affect other programs like HIV treatment, care and support. We cannot afford to risk more lives because of the key affected population,” she said.

In September last year, Uganda wrote a concept note asking Global Fund for USD 119m which was meant to buy the saving life drugs (ARVs) but put to now they have not replenished the money. Probably that explains to why the Uganda has been having HIV commodities stock out.

“We would have gotten this money by now but Global Fund is keeping quiet and we do not know what to do,” she said.

 

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