Health
Uganda’s TB lab best in east and central Africa
Publish Date: Feb 01, 2014
Uganda’s TB lab best in east and central Africa
Minister of Health Dr. Ruhakana Rugunda (R) and the US Ambassador to Uganda Scott Delisi (2nd-R) touring the Supranational TB reference lab based in Wandegeya, Kampala on July 11, 2013. PHOTO/Tony Rujuta.
  • mail
  • img
newvision

By Taddeo Bwambale

Uganda’s National TB Reference Laboratory based in Kampala is the best facility in diagnosis of TB-related diseases in East and Central Africa.


The lab has received the Supra National Reference Laboratory (SRL) certification in 2013 from the World Health Organization (WHO), making it one of only two such facilities in Africa.

Only 33 supranational tuberculosis reference labs exist worldwide.

The health ministry’s spokesperson, Rukia Nakamatte said the recognition was a sign of quality in diagnosis and research at the facility that comes second to another lab in South Africa.

Established in July last year, the lab provides in-country support in various areas of quality TB diagnosis and supports 13 other African countries which send samples to Uganda for testing.

The facility carries out rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis, including multi-resistant strains which have become due to non-compliance to treatment and supply related challenges.

As a result of improvements in testing and treatment, Uganda boasts of a 77% treatment success rate and the uptake of TB/HIV services has significantly improved to about 90%.

Tuberculosis remains a major global health problem. In 2012, an estimated 8.6 million people developed TB and 1.3 million died from the disease, including 320 000 deaths among HIV-positive people.

According to the Global Tuberculosis Report 2013, the rate of new TB cases has been falling worldwide for about a decade, although progress is generally considered low.

The report shows that Uganda is one of seven countries out of the 22 high-burden countries that have met the MDG targets for combating Tuberculosis. 

The number of people dying due to Tuberculosis (TB) over the last 12 years was halved from 9,900 in 1990 to 4,700 in 2012.

The statements, comments, or opinions expressed through the use of New Vision Online are those of their respective authors, who are solely responsible for them, and do not necessarily represent the views held by the staff and management of New Vision Online.

New Vision Online reserves the right to moderate, publish or delete a post without warning or consultation with the author.Find out why we moderate comments. For any questions please contact digital@newvision.co.ug

  • mail
  • img
blog comments powered by Disqus
Also In This Section
Long wait yet for Ebola vaccine
It will be months, at least, before a vaccine becomes available to tackle Ebola, experts say....
Dr. Mawanda’s miraculous recovery from Ebola
For a man who was at the edge of the grave after suffering multiple organ failure, it is a miracle Mawanda is alive....
EU calls for 5,000 doctors to fight Ebola
The European Commission called for 5,000 doctors to be sent from EU states to combat west Africa's Ebola epidemic....
Elderly should take cholesterol-lowering drugs
Nearly everyone aged 66 to 75 should consider taking cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins to reduce their risk of heart attack and stroke....
Should you really go for that barbecue?
Nutritionists warn that barbecues could be a recipe for disaster because such food contributes to the risk of cancer....
Can robots help stop the Ebola outbreak?
The US military has enlisted a new germ-killing weapon in the fight against Ebola - a four-wheeled robot that can disinfect a room in minutes with pulses of ultraviolet light....
Should Govt lease parts of Lake Victoria to private developers?
Its Ok
No Way
Not Sure
follow us
subscribe to our news letter