Science & technology
Smart shirt knows when you're not up to snuff
Publish Date: Jan 13, 2014
Smart shirt knows when you're not up to snuff
  • mail
  • img
newvision

by Glenn CHAPMAN

 
LAS VEGAS, January 10, 2014 (AFP) - French fashion is getting smarter with the help of fabric woven with micro-sensors that can reveal when someone is weary or unwell.
 
France-based Cityzen Sciences was at the Consumer Electronics Show on Friday with shirts made of "Smart Sensing" material that reads body heat, heart rate, motion and location.
 
"The fabric can be made into any clothing; gloves, shirts, pants, you name it," said Gilbert Reveillon, international managing director at Cityzen, the lead company in a consortium that created the material.
 
"It is the first time ever that we managed to mix these two industries, embedding sensors into textile."
 
Sensors in the shirt capture data about a wearer and transmit the information through a small battery-powered unit sewn discretely where a label typically goes.
 
The data is sent in real-time wirelessly to a smartphone, where an application charts it in a timeline and alerts people to potential physical problems.
 
The application can show if a wearer is tired or stressed, or even if a coming heart attack is coming, according to Reveillon.
 
"You can't prevent a heart attack from happening, but you could definitely detect it hours, or even days, ahead of it taking place," Reveillon told AFP.
 
"On the field, a coach could tell when a member of the team has been running over capacity and put in a fresh player."
 
The material was developed in collaboration with major French sports teams as well as members of the health industry.
 
The Cityzen smart shirt was honored for innovation at a first-ever digital health summit at CES.
 
"This really does seem like science fiction," Everyday Health chief operating officer Paul Slavin quipped after presenting Cityzen a top award for innovation.
 
Everyday Health, a digital health company, sponsored the prize.
 
A member of the Cityzen team wore the shirt while venturing for more than an hour along the famed Las Vegas strip, with his smartphone revealing how his body handled the outing.
 
"The Las Vegas street definitely increases the heartbeat," Reveillon said. "The vibes are very positive."
 
The smart fabric can be laundered and ironed without worry.
 
"In two years' time, by washing it, you will recharge the batteries," Reveillon promised.
 
The material was said to cost about 30 to 40 percent more than commonly used fabric.
 
The fabric was expected to be in commercial products late this year.
 
"It will be worldwide, either medical or sports," Reveillon said.
 
"Our proposal is to imbed micro-sensors now, nano-sensors soon, into any fabric."
 
Potential uses of the material will only be limited by the creativity and talent of software savants making applications that analyze and react to what is learned about wearers.
 
"A child could be wearing this shirt and, if a mother sees his heart rate and temperature jump, she can call him home and even watch the path he takes," Reveillon said.
 
The Smart Sensing consortium is backed, in part, by the French government.
 
The fabric is part of a hot trend of putting low-cost sensors in anything from light fixtures to jewelry or the soles of shoes to make environments adapt to or provide feedback regarding what people want or do.
 

The statements, comments, or opinions expressed through the use of New Vision Online are those of their respective authors, who are solely responsible for them, and do not necessarily represent the views held by the staff and management of New Vision Online.

New Vision Online reserves the right to moderate, publish or delete a post without warning or consultation with the author.Find out why we moderate comments. For any questions please contact digital@newvision.co.ug

  • mail
  • img
blog comments powered by Disqus
Also In This Section
Hackers trick way into ICANN computers
The private agency that acts as a gatekeeper for the Internet on Wednesday said that hackers tricked their way into its computers....
Venus probe ends after it runs out of fuel
The space probe that spent eight years carrying out a detailed analysis of Venus is out of fuel, and is set to die....
Dutch privacy watchdog probes Facebook
A Dutch government-affiliated watchdog has said it is probing changes in Facebook's privacy policy, the latest skirmish in a wider fight over the commercial use of online personal data...
NASA finds evidence of
METHANE, a gas that on Earth comes mainly from living organisms, has been measured for the first time making a sudden spike on Mars, leaving scientists puzzled about its origin...
Google constitution archive adds Arabic documents
GOOGLE'S online archive of the world's constitutions on Monday launched an Arabic-language version with searchable documents from 54 countries...
Microsoft
MICROSOFT announced a new step toward real-time translation, launching a Spanish-English test program using its Skype messaging service...
What is causing the rise in Early child marriages?
Decaying social structures
Poor Education
None of the above
follow us
subscribe to our news letter