Supplements
Leaders fail to declare wealthPublish Date: Jan 08, 2014
newvision
  • mail
  • img

By Mary Karugaba

According to the latest report by the Inspectorate of Government to Parliament for the period January–June 2013, 27% of the total number of leaders expected to declare their wealth failed to comply.


Majority of public officers who failed to declare their wealth were UPDF officers, reveals the report.

The Inspector General of Government, Irene Mulyagonja, has, however, warned in the report that she will soon crack down on the leaders who failed to comply.



“The Inspectorate of Government will soon embark on identifying the leaders who have not yet declared their income, assets and liabilities and write to them to show cause why measures under the Leadership Code Act should not be taken against them,” the report states.

The Leadership Code Act, 2002, requires specific leaders to declare their incomes, assets and liabilities to the Inspector General of Government from time to time explaining how they acquired or incurred them.

During the period under review, 18,664 leaders filled their declaration forms and a total of 7,575 received forms, were examined, acknowledgement slips processed and issued to them.

However, 27% of the total number of leaders never returned the forms.

 



The report says three individuals’ wealth was investigated and recommended for prosecution while two other officers were ordered to recover the funds. The three were however not named.

The IGG, however, noted that lack of a Leadership Code tribunal and the delayed amendment of the Leadership Code Act, 2002, still remains a significant hindrance to the enforcement of the Leadership Code.

She recommended the amendment of the Leadership Code Act and the establishment of the Leadership Code Tribunal to enable full enforcement of the Code.

Gifts declarations

The report also reveals that during the period under review, the then State Minister for Luwero Triangle, Rose Namayanja, was ordered to sell off a gift of an in-calf heifer that she had received and the proceeds handed over to the permanent secretary in the Office of the Prime Minister.

The report further says, the executive director of Kampala Capital City Authority, Jennifer Musisi, received two Indian sari fabrics but was advised to put them to personal use.

Corruption cases

The report says that out of 856 corruption complaints received during the period under review, 112 complaints were investigated, processed and referred to other institutions.

However, after the investigations, the report indicates that 40 public officers were arrested for various corruption offences and charged in courts of law. By June 30, 2013, the report says 96 cases were on-going at first trial stage and 29 cases on appeal.

“The Inspectorate of Government prosecuted 145 cases, out of which 128 were carried forward from the previous period and 17 were new cases registered in courts of law during the reporting period. Fifteen cases resulted into conviction, 6 resulted in acquittals, 3 cases were withdrawn, and one was dismissed,” the report states.

 



Also, over 500 complaints ranging from mismanagement of public funds and property, non-payment or delayed payment of salaries and other benefits, delay of service delivery, victimisation/oppression and irregularities in procurement and award of contracts and tenders were received. Of these, a total of 71 complaints were processed and referred to other institutions while 13 complaints were found to lack merit.

Most complaints, according to the report, were about the Ministry of Public Service. Most of the complaints were relating to deletion from payroll and non-payment of pension and salary arrears.

The IGG, however, noted that despite the continued support by Government and donors to strengthen the institution, the inspectorate continues to face a number of constraints and challenges such as inadequate funding, inadequacies in the existing legal framework, limited human and financial resources, negative societal attitudes and resistance to implementation of inspectorate’s recommendations.

She appealed to Parliament to debate the inspectorate’s reports and provide appropriate feedback for improved performance.

The statements, comments, or opinions expressed through the use of New Vision Online are those of their respective authors, who are solely responsible for them, and do not necessarily represent the views held by the staff and management of New Vision Online.

New Vision Online reserves the right to moderate, publish or delete a post without warning or consultation with the author.Find out why we moderate comments. For any questions please contact digital@newvision.co.ug

  • mail
  • img
blog comments powered by Disqus
Also In This Section
Tian Tang Group, an industry worth over $30m was officially opened on July 14. The industry based in Kasenge, Mukono District. Its management believe in building a self-reliant Uganda...
Mission “To instill and maintain efficient and effective systems in Government that enable Uganda to rapidly develop”...
The French Bastille Day, is a time for the French, as a Nation, to stand and have a collective introspective reading of their history, shaped by their achievements and expectations. The New Vision team caught up with the French Ambassador, H.E Mrs. Sophie Makame, below are the excerpts...
For 21 years, Marie Stopes Uganda (MSU) has been working in Uganda to provide voluntary family planning services to thousands of men and women and youth across the country....
The National Oil and Gas Policy for Uganda, which was approved on 30th January, 2008, is the key document guiding the development of the country’s oil and gas sector....
Uganda developed a Water Action Plan between 1993 and 1994 to provide a framework for water resources management and development in the country....
Should private schools and institutions be given tax exemption?
Yes
No
Can't Say
follow us
subscribe to our news letter