Somalia needs bit of patience
Publish Date: May 05, 2012
  • mail
  • img

By Paddy Ankunda

Many like Safi a Omar, a resident of Mogadishu will tell you that bombing Somalia’s national theatre on April 4, had robbed her country of a brief sense that things were getting better.

Safi a vented out her frustration in a brief interview with Reuters hours after a suicide bomber killed six people in Mogadishu. This kind of frustration is understandable. Safi a, like many other Somalis, is not confident that the current government will deliver on its promises to restore durable peace and stability.

For those of us who work in Mogadishu and have seen progressively, the improving situation in the country since 2007 can only ask Safi a for more patience. Mogadishu is more peaceful today than it has been in the last 20 years.

However, such attacks are a reminder to the Transitional Federal Government and AMISOM that it is not over yet. While the insurgents were forced out of Mogadishu last August, a number of them melted into the population bent on instilling fear through suicide attacks.

This calls for extra vigilance not only on the part of the government but also on the population as a whole.
Not once, not twice, the terrorists have demonstrated their ability to sneak through the lines and attack civilians in areas under our control.

This calls for a rethinking of our internal security strategies in liberated areas. That they were forced out of Mogadishu was a clear demonstration by Allied forces that Al Shabaab can be defeated and this momentum must not be lost. President Sheikh Sharif rightly stated that the group’s increasing recourse to suicide attacks was a sign of their growing weakness.

While this may be true, attacks on innocent civilians are also a test of the government’s ability to protect its people.

As AMISOM continues to expand into the countryside, the government must continue to demonstrate its capacity to protect civilians in towns and villages. That way, civilians will gain confidence in the government’s resolve to change the course of history.

Already, AMISOM has deployed 100 soldiers to Baidoa, the advance party of the 2,500 soldiers expected to be deployed by April.

AMISOM’s Kenyan troops are deployed in the south; and this expansion is expected to deliver more military success. As such, time has come for the Somali government to integrate military objectives into an overall political strategy.
The writer is the AMISOM Force spokesman in Mogadishu

The statements, comments, or opinions expressed through the use of New Vision Online are those of their respective authors, who are solely responsible for them, and do not necessarily represent the views held by the staff and management of New Vision Online.

New Vision Online reserves the right to moderate, publish or delete a post without warning or consultation with the author.Find out why we moderate comments. For any questions please contact digital@newvision.co.ug

  • mail
  • img
blog comments powered by Disqus
Also In This Section
Pope Francis in Africa: Leadership and Inspiration in the Face of Climate Change
THE Pope is in a unique position. As head of the smallest country in the world, his ability to legislate on climate change may have limited impact...
Climate change is here
Dear Pope Francis, Your visit to Uganda, which coincides with COP21 climate negotiations in Paris, comes at a crucial time, though, both for our country and the world...
After Paris
The attacks in Paris by individuals associated with the Islamic State, coming on the heels of bombings in Beirut and the downing of a Russian airliner over the Sinai Peninsula, reinforce the reality that the terrorist threat has entered a new and even more dangerous phase....
Hypocritical response of “international community” to terror attacks
The months of October/November 2015 will truly go down in the annals of our global history as a period of unprecedented resurgence in Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) - instigated terrorist assaults....
Empower children in this holiday break
December holidays are just an inch away in Uganda. Primary seven pupils are already at home in their holidays. Senior Four and Six are equally winding up their school programs. The rest of the classes will soon follow suit....
Why Paris Climate agreement should block fossil fuels
By Boaz Opio Do you ever wonder why despite all efforts global climate change activism put in stamping out dirty energy productions, there seems to be a resisting, highly biased force halting governments’ renewable energy development efforts?...
Is Uganda ready for the pope's visit?
Can't Say
follow us
subscribe to our news letter